“The Future of Selling” is here

We’re pleased to share the latest thought leadership from OgilvyOne Worldwide, a new white paper entitled “The Future of Selling.” View the white paper or to download the printable PDF, click the red link directly below.

Just in case you missed it, click HERE to view “The Future of Selling” presentation.

Here are some photos from the event held at The Chocolate Factory, Ogilvy’s HQ in New York, on November 30:

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Brian Fetherstonhaugh is Chairman and CEO for OgilvyOne Worldwide. Brian has a unique vantage point on how brands are built, how corporate cultures are created, and what happens as the world goes digital.    In the course of the past 25 years, Brian has worked hands-on with many of the world’s leading brands including, IBM, American Express, Cisco, Coca-Cola, Motorola, Unilever, Nestlé, BP, Kodak, and Yahoo!   

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4 comments on ““The Future of Selling” is here
  1. Mish Fletcher says:

    See what Dr Paul Marsden at Social Commerce Today says about The Future of Selling report:

    http://socialcommercetoday.com/speed-summary-ogilvyone-report-on-the-future-of-social-selling/

  2. Mish Fletcher says:

    See what Dr Paul Marsden at Social Commerce Today says about The Future of Selling report:

    http://socialcommercetoday.com/speed-summary-ogilvyone-report-on-the-future-of-social-selling/

  3. Thanks for reminding us that selling is important.

    The role of the salesperson is often belittled by many who build technology systems for marketing. It’s almost as if the goal is to make the salesperson irrelevant while the computer does all the work. It reminds me of the ancient kings who hired sorcerers to help defeat their enemies. A magic sword makes for a good story but the king with the well trained army usually won the war.

  4. Thanks for reminding us that selling is important.

    The role of the salesperson is often belittled by many who build technology systems for marketing. It’s almost as if the goal is to make the salesperson irrelevant while the computer does all the work. It reminds me of the ancient kings who hired sorcerers to help defeat their enemies. A magic sword makes for a good story but the king with the well trained army usually won the war.

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